The Univeristy of Melbourne The Royal Melbourne Hopspital

A joint venture between The University of Melbourne and The Royal Melbourne Hospital

EDUCATION

Research Projects

Project: Understanding immunity towards seasonal influenza vaccines

Kedzierska group

Annual influenza vaccinations provide the most effective strategy to blunt the impact of seasonal influenza infections and protect from severe disease. However, the efficacy of influenza vaccines varies from year to year and between individuals. Our recent study (Koutsakos M et al, Science Translational Medicine, 2018) dissected immunity towards seasonal influenza vaccine in healthy adults and identified that T follicular helper cells, antibody-secreting cells and memory B cells are associated with successful influenza vaccination. The current project provides exciting opportunities to understand immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines in individuals at high risk of severe disease, specifically the elderly and immunosuppressed patients. 

Contact project supervisor for further
information and application enquiries

Project Supervisor

Professor Katherine Kedzierska 

Project Co-supervisor

Dr Oanh Nguyen 

Project availability
PhD/MPhil
Master of Biomedical Science
Honours

Kedzierska group

[email protected]

2 vacancies

Themes
Immunology
Viral Infectious Diseases
Cross Cutting Disciplines
Translational and Clinical Research
Discovery Research
Indigenous Health

The Kedzierska group has a strong international profile in human immunology, with a major focus on universal broadly-protective T cell immunity to seasonal, pandemic and avian influenza viruses. The main goals are to identify key correlates of severe and fatal influenza disease in high-risk groups, and to understand mechanisms underlying generation of optimal immunity to influenza viruses in young children, adults, the elderly, pregnant women, hospitalised patients and Indigenous Australians. Our studies intend to improve vaccine and therapeutic designs to protect against severe influenza, with possible applications to other infectious diseases and tumours. 


Kedzierska group Current Projects