The Univeristy of Melbourne The Royal Melbourne Hopspital

A joint venture between The University of Melbourne and The Royal Melbourne Hospital

Flow Cytometry

Flow cytometry is a laser-based technology for counting, sorting, and biomarker detection of cells suspended in a stream of fluid that passes by an electronic detection apparatus. This is a rapid method for simultaneous analysis and segregation of cells based on their physical and chemical characteristics. Flow cytometry is routinely used in the diagnosis of health disorders, especially blood cancers, but has many other applications in basic research, clinical practice and clinical trials. A common variation is to physically sort particles based on their properties so researchers can purify populations of interest. The Doherty Institute houses the ImmunoID, a purpose-built facility that provides researchers with a world-class flow cytometry resource. Equipped with the latest high-end instrumentation, it also forms part of the Melbourne Cytometry Platform, providing a resource for the University of Melbourne and broader scientific community in and around Melbourne. The flow cytometry platform houses two PC2 high-speed sorters (FACS Aria III and MoFlo Astrios) and five analysers (LSR Fortessa 2x FACS Calibur, FACS Canto II and Canto II). FACs Calibur is for cell analysis and the MoFlo Astrios for cell sorting. 

Flow Cytometry

CONTACT

T:+61 3 8344 8050
E:Tina Luke

Electron Microscopy

The Doherty Institute houses a Tecnai G2 Spirit Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), specifically designed for life sciences, allowing atomic-level investigations in cell biology, structural biology, soft matter, (bio)-nanotechnology, and high resolution imaging of microbes such as bacteria and viruses. The Doherty Institute’s TEM is part of an Electron Microscopy platform within the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct that combines instrumentation of the Doherty Institute, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, and the School of Botany, and operates under the umbrella of the University of Melbourne's Advanced Microscopy Facility.

Electron Microscopy

CONTACT

T:+61 3 9342 9678
E:Dr John Marshall

Imaging

The Doherty Institute is equipped with cutting-edge imaging equipment for PC2 and PC3 applications and is part of the Biological Optical Microscopy Platform (BOMP). There are three microscopes capable of epifluorescent and light microscopy, two cameras available for image acquisition and two Zeiss confocal microscopes, one of which has an incubation chamber for live cell imaging. The Doherty Institute also houses two 2-photon/confocal microscopes (a Zeiss 710 and an Olympus FVMPERS) within the multi-photon facility, which is designed to facilitate intravital imaging of mouse tissues and organs, and has significantly expanded the possibilities for research in microbiology and the immune system. Also available via the BOMP network is super resolution imaging platforms including 3D-Structured Illumination Microscopy (3D-SIM), Localisation microscopy (PALM, STORM) and a Zeiss LSM800 Airyscan confocal. Three high-performance imaging computers are available for image analyses, as well as facilities for sectioning of both fresh and frozen tissue for imaging.

Imaging

CONTACT

T:+ 61 9035 3021
E:Paul McMillan

Genomics

Doherty Applied Microbial Genomics houses state-of-the-art technology that utilises next-generation DNA sequencing located within the Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory (MDU PHL). The centre is home to an onsite PacBio RSII sequencer, which is one of only three in Australia and the only one of its kind located within a public health facility in the country. The centre also harnesses advanced, high-end computation capabilities led by world-renowned bioinformatician University of Melbourne Associate Professor Torsten Seemann from the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI), which enables scientists to use the large amount of data generated by sequencing microbial genomes to fast track their investigations and respond to disease outbreaks, assisting clinicians to make more informed therapeutic decisions. Other facilities include an Illumina NextSeq short read sequencer, Next Gen 454 and Ion Torrent sequencers, PyroMark 96-well pyrosequencer, Sanger 24 capillary sequencer, bioanalyzers for chip assays, and 12 real-time PCR machines.  

Genomics

CONTACT

T:+61 3 8344 8867
E:Glen Carter