The Univeristy of Melbourne The Royal Melbourne Hopspital

A joint venture between The University of Melbourne and The Royal Melbourne Hospital

  • Research Groups
    • Howden Group

      Ben’s group’s research uses genomics, molecular biology, epidemiology and clinical studies to address a broad range of issues related to invasive bacterial diseases in humans, especially those caused by staphylococci, enterococci and other antimicrobial-resistant species. Additionally, working closely with scientists in the MDU PHL, they investigate the epidemiology, evolution, and spread of bacterial pathogens of public health significance such as Neisseria gonorrhoea, Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella and Salmonella spp., Legionella spp., and carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacteria.


    • McVernon Group

      Jodie McVernon’s group uses established and emerging epidemiologic methods to address infectious diseases questions of public health relevance. Particular areas of focus aligned with Doherty’s laboratory and genomics expertise include influenza and other respiratory viruses, viral hepatitis, vaccine preventable diseases, antimicrobial resistance and ‘neglected’ pathogens such as scabies and Group A Streptococcus. We are active in the Australian Partnership for Preparedness Research on Infectious Diseases Emergencies (APPRISE) and Policy Relevant Infectious Diseases Simulation and Mathematical Modelling (PRISM2) NHMRC Centres of Research Excellence, and bring a broad suite of collaborators from animal health and ecology to provide a ‘One Health’ perspective on emerging human pathogens.


    • National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship

      The National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship (NCAS) is a health services research program that aims to improve the use of antimicrobials across animal and human health, to influence national policy, and to generate a research workforce across nurses, pharmacists, doctors and veterinarians. NCAS aims to lead and facilitate the embedding of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) within clinical practice across diverse healthcare settings and among different practitioner groups in Australia. Its research and surveillance programs aim to improve antimicrobial prescribing by understanding prescribing behaviours through qualitative and quantitative methods, monitoring current prescribing patterns across healthcare settings, identifying targets for quality improvement, and developing interventions, new policies and practices.


    • Robins-Browne Group

      Research in Roy’s laboratory is partly focused on how E. coli causes diarrhoea, with the aims of identifying better ways to diagnose, treat and prevent these infections. Another theme is the development of new types of antibacterial agents.

      Other work areas include: Enteric infections, Immunology


    • Stinear Group

      Tim’s group’s research addresses priorities across four connected themes that including hospital superbugs, pathogenic mycobacteria, natural product discovery and public health genomics that aim to understand and contain the spread of bacteria causing serious human disease. 


    • Tong Clinical Research Group

      Steve’s group conducts clinical trials to optimise the treatment of infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other bacterial pathogens. He also investigates the epidemiology and drivers of antimicrobial resistance in Australian Indigenous communities.